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Easton Press, "The Great Military Commanders" Leather Bound Collector's Edition, 7 Vol. Complete Matched Set



 
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A wonderful bright clean copy free of any markings, writings, or stamps. Sharp corners that are not bumped. Tight and square spine. Unread book. No attached bookplates or indication of any removed.

  $750.00
 
Publisher: Easton Press (1993)
Binding: Leather Bound (Full genuine leather)
Edition: Limited Edition
Dimensions: 9"x6"x1.5"

Stock Status:(Currently not available)

Availability: Same Day Shipping
Product Code: 470-168

Description
 

Easton Press, Norwalk CT. "The Great Military Commanders". A complete matching seven volume set. Each volume is luxuriously bound in full genuine leather. All volumes in very fine condition without any flaws. Unread books.

A complete seven volume set that includes the following titles:

  1. Robert E. Lee: The Wartime Papers of Robert E. Lee (Vol. I)
  2. Robert E. Lee: The Wartime Papers of Robert E. Lee (Vol. II)
  3. Julius Caesar: The Gallic Wars
  4. Erwin Rommel: The Rommel Papers
  5. Arthur Wellesley: Duke of Wellington, Wellington At War 1794-1815
  6. Patton: War As I Knew It
  7. Napoleon Bonaparte: The Corsican


Robert E. Lee: The Wartime Papers of Robert E. Lee (Vol. I)

Editor: Clifford Dowdey
Associate Editor: Louis H. Manarin
With connective narratives by Clifford Dowdey and maps by Samuel H. Bryant.

Lee graduated number two in his class from the U.S. Military Academy in 1829. Commissioned a brevet lieutenant of engineers, he spent a few years at Ft. Pulaski, Ga., and Ft. Monroe, Va. At Ft. Monroe on June 30, 1831, he married Mary Ann Randolph Custis. The Lees had seven children. Lee worked in the chief engineer's office in Washington, D.C., from 1834 to 1837. He was transferred to Ft. Hamilton, N.Y., where he remained until 1846. In August 1846 Lee joined Gen. John E. Wool's army in Texas. In the battle of Buena Vista, Lee's boldness drew his superiors' attention. Transferred to Gen. Winfield Scott's Veracruz expedition, in the battle at Veracruz and in the advance on Mexico he won additional acclaim. Following American occupation of the Mexican capital, he worked on maps for possible future campaigns. Already a captain in the regular service, he was made brevet colonel for his gallantry in the war. Lee returned to engineer duty at Baltimore's Ft. Carroll until 1852, when he reluctantly became superintendent of the Military Academy at West Point. In 1855 he was made lieutenant colonel of the 2d Cavalry, one of the Army's elite units.

Robert E. Lee: The Wartime Papers of Robert E. Lee (Vol. II)

Editor: Clifford Dowdey
Associate Editor: Louis H. Manarin
With connective narratives by Clifford Dowdey and maps by Samuel H. Bryant.

Lee graduated number two in his class from the U.S. Military Academy in 1829. Commissioned a brevet lieutenant of engineers, he spent a few years at Ft. Pulaski, Ga., and Ft. Monroe, Va. At Ft. Monroe on June 30, 1831, he married Mary Ann Randolph Custis. The Lees had seven children. Lee worked in the chief engineer's office in Washington, D.C., from 1834 to 1837. He was transferred to Ft. Hamilton, N.Y., where he remained until 1846. In August 1846 Lee joined Gen. John E. Wool's army in Texas. In the battle of Buena Vista, Lee's boldness drew his superiors' attention. Transferred to Gen. Winfield Scott's Veracruz expedition, in the battle at Veracruz and in the advance on Mexico he won additional acclaim. Following American occupation of the Mexican capital, he worked on maps for possible future campaigns. Already a captain in the regular service, he was made brevet colonel for his gallantry in the war. Lee returned to engineer duty at Baltimore's Ft. Carroll until 1852, when he reluctantly became superintendent of the Military Academy at West Point. In 1855 he was made lieutenant colonel of the 2d Cavalry, one of the Army's elite units.


Julius Caesar: The Gallic Wars

Translation by John Warrington
with a Preface John Mason Brown and Introduction by translator.
Illustrated with the engravings by Bruno Bramanti

The Gallic War by Caesar was written just over two thousand years ago by one of the greatest military minds the world has ever known. Unfortunately many people think it is a scholarly work, which it is not, it is a war diary, carefully edited for political consumption. The value of this book is the view it gives of Caesar himself and how he met and overcame his adversaries. As he recounts his battle plans and their results in his detailed reports to the senate in Rome, from his own words, the reader can get the feel of how he fought on the battlefields and in the political spheres of his times. Caesar's strategies were sometimes cunning, often tricky, but generally just exceptionally logical. His character could be described as a schizoid mix of Dr. Spock and Captain Kirk combined into one person on a polite rampage. At times you can almost picture Caesar sitting bloodied in the dirt trying to put the whole thing into words that will not offend the prissy senators sitting on their marble benches back in Rome. Nothing was too daring to try in his win/lose world of politics and battlefields and his solutions ranged from unbelievably complex (building moats and bridges while engaged in battle), to just burning down the walls. Once the battles were over, whenever possible, he strove to setup a political order among the conquered that would keep them conquered and even though over two thousand years have passed we still call it imperialism. Much can be learned from reading this book about the man who fights so he can be free and the man who fights for the state and is never free. It all leaves you with the unanswerable questions: So what would our world of today be like if there had been no Caesar and what would Caesar have been like if there had been no Rome?


Erwin Rommel: The Rommel Papers

Edited: B. H. Liddell Hart
with the assistance of Lucie-Maria Rommel, Manfred Rommel and General Fritz Bayerlein
Translated by Paul Findlay

When Erwin Rommel died-by forced suicide at Hitler's command-he left behind in various ingenious hiding places the papers that recorded the story of his dramatic career and the exact details of his masterly campaigns. It was his custom to dictate each evening a running narrative of the day's events and, after each battle, to summarize its course and the lessons to be learned from it. He wrote, almost daily, intimate and outspoken letters to his wife in which his private feelings and-after the tide had turned-forebodings found expression. To this is added by Rommel's son Manfred the story of the field marshall's last weeks and the final day when he was given the choice of an honorable suicide or an ignominious trial for treason. An engrossing human document and a rare look at the mind of the "Desert Fox," The Rommel Papers throws an interesting light on the Axis alliance and on the inner workings of Hitler's high command


Arthur Wellesley: Duke of Wellington, Wellington At War 1794-1815

A selection of his wartime letters Edited and introduced by Antony Brett-James

Field Marshal Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG GCB GCH PC FRS (1 May 1769 - 14 September 1852), was an Anglo-Irish soldier and statesman, a native of Ireland belonging to the Protestant Ascendancy, and one of the leading military and political figures of the 19th century. Regarded as one of Britain's most significant military figures, in 2002 he was placed at number 15 in the BBC's poll of the 100 Greatest Britons. Wellesley was commissioned as an ensign in the British Army in 1787. Serving in Ireland as aide-de-camp to two successive Lords Lieutenant of Ireland he was also elected as a Member of Parliament in the Irish House of Commons. A colonel by 1796, Wellesley saw action in the Netherlands and in India, where he fought in the Fourth Anglo-Mysore War at the Battle of Seringapatam. He was appointed governor of Seringapatam and Mysore in 1799 and as a newly appointed major-general won a decisive victory over the Maratha Confederacy at the Battle of Assaye in 1803. Wellesley rose to prominence as a general during the Peninsular campaign of the Napoleonic Wars, and was promoted to the rank of field marshal after leading the allied forces to victory against the French at the Battle of Vitoria in 1813. Following Napoleon's exile in 1814, he served as the ambassador to France and was granted a dukedom. During the Hundred Days in 1815, he commanded the allied army which, together with a Prussian army under BlŸcher, defeated Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo. Wellesley's battle record is exemplary; he ultimately participated in some 60 battles during the course of his military career. Wellesley is famous for his adaptive defensive style of warfare, resulting in several victories against a numerically superior force while minimising his own losses. He is regarded as one of the greatest defensive commanders of all time, and many of his tactics and battle plans are still studied in military academies around the world. After ending his active military career, Wellesley returned to politics. He was twice British prime minister as part of the Tory party: from 1828-30 and for a little less than a month in 1834. He oversaw the passage of the Catholic Relief Act 1829, but opposed the Reform Act 1832. He continued as one of the leading figures in the House of Lords until his retirement and remained Commander-in-Chief of the British Army until his death.


Patton: War As I Knew It

War As I Knew It" is not an autobiography. It is not a study of World War II. And it is not a doctoral dissertation. It is simply one of the greatest, most insightful accounts of the campaign in NW Europe, beautifully written by one of history's most charismatic and successful generals.The book begins with a collection of open letters written by Patton during the time of his campaigns in North Africa and Sicily. For cesnorship reasons, these letters do not contain much battle information, but they provide a unique insight into the man Patton was, and how he dealt with problems that were not military in nature. He discusses his meeting with French and Arab leaders in attempts to protect his rear while he defeated the Germans to his front. The letters from Sicily are similar, discussing not so much tactics but outcomes, reactions, and the like. These early letters show how much Patton was moved around, and the interesting places that he visited. The main part of the book covers Patton's proudest moments--commanding the U.S. Third Army. This section is wholly unique. Written shortly after they campaign ended with Germany's surrender, Patton describes the actions of Third Army from Normandy to Czechoslovakia. While he does not go into great detail about tactics and such, he provides a window into his own mind. The reader knows what he was thinking when he made his decisions, and the reasons that he made those decisions. In so doing, the reader gets a firm understanding of how an army worked in WW II. Also, he mentions his personal relationships with many different generals...ones you don't read about in history books. In short, this is a first hand account from the man who was a pure warrior.


Napoleon Bonaparte: The Corsican

Military general and first emperor of France, Napoleon Bonaparte was born on August 15, 1769, in Ajaccio, Corsica, France. One of the most celebrated leaders in the history of the West, he revolutionized military organization and training, sponsored Napoleonic Code, reorganized education and established the long-lived Concordat with the papacy. He died on May 5, 1821, on the island of St. Helena in the South Atlantic Ocean. Considered one of the world's greatest military leaders, Napoleon Bonaparte was born on August 15, 1769, in Ajaccio, Corsica, France. He was the fourth, and second surviving, child of Carlo Buonaparte, a lawyer, and his wife, Letizia Ramolino. By the time around Napoleon's birth, Corsica's occupation by the French had drawn considerable local resistance. Carlo Buonaparte had at first supported the nationalists siding with their leader, Pasquale Paoli. But after Paoli was forced to flee the island, Carlo switched his allegiance to the French. After doing so he was appointed assessor of the judicial district of Ajaccio in 1771, a plush job that eventually enabled him to enroll his two sons, Joseph and Napoleon, in France's College d'Autun. Eventually, Napoleon ended up at the military college of Brienne, where he studied for five years, before moving on to the military academy in Paris. In 1785, while Napoleon was at the academy, his father died of stomach cancer. This propelled Napoleon to take the reins as the head of the family. Graduating early from the military academy, Napoleon, now second lieutenant of artillery, returned to Corsica in 1786.

Features
Includes all the classic Easton Press qualities:

* Premium Leather
* Silk Moire Endleaves
* Distinctive Cover Design
* Hubbed Spine, Accented in Real 22KT Gold
* Satin Ribbon Page Marker
* Gilded Page Edges
* Long-lasting, High Quality Acid-neutral Paper
* Smyth-sewn Pages for Strength and Durability
* Beautiful Illustrations


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