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Stephen King "Salem's Lot" First Edition, Second State "Father Cody" Q37 Code (Fine/Near Fine)
Stephen King Salem's Lot Centipede Press Signed


 
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Doubleday 1975
Publisher: 8.5"x6"x1.5"
Binding: dj/HC
Edition: First Edition, Second Issue
Dimensions: Fine/Near Fine

Stock Status:(Currently not available)

Availability: Same Day Shipping
Product Code: SK482

Description
 

King has said, “In ‘Salem’s Lot, the thing that really scared me was not vampires but the town in the daytime, the town that was empty, knowing that there were things in closets, that there were people tucked under beds, under the concrete pilings of all those trailers. And all the time I was writing that, the Watergate hearings were pouring out of the TV… I was thinking about secrets, things that have been hidden and were being dragged out into the light.”


Stephen King. "’Salem’s Lot" Garden City. Doubleday, Copyright May 1975. 439 pages. Octavo with original half black cloth and original dust jacket. "First Edition" as stated on copyright page. Jacket design by Al Nagy. Jacket illustration by Dave Christensen. ISBN 0-385-00751-5. Printed in the U.S.A.

A great opportunity to own the rare first edition of King’s second novel, 'Salem's Lot. This is the haunting story of one New England village’s sinister secrets. This is the first edition  in the second-issue dust jacket. It is virtually impossible to find this edition with the first-issue dust jacket.

This is the Second State: The $8.95 price is factory clipped off and a price of $7.95 is printed on instead. Father Cody is referred to instead of Father Callahan on the dust-jacket. First Edition printing run was only 20,000 copies.


Condition: Fine/Near Fine. A Fine hardcover clean copy free of marks, writing or stamps. No attached bookplates or indication of any removed. Tight spine without any binding separation. Spine lettering clear and not faded. Near Fine dust-jacket with mild wear to extremities. Short closed tear. All photos of the actual item. 


Salem's Lot is unique because it has three states. The states refer to differences in the dustjacket due to errors in the printing of the dustjacket only. The hardcover book itself is the same across all three states. All three states show the words First Edition on the copyright page and code Q37 on the inner margin of page 439.

  • First State - The front flap of the dust jacket has an unclipped price of $8.95 in the top right corner and the text refers to "Father Cody" instead of "Father Callahan" as found in later states/edition.
  • Second State - The $8.95 is clipped off and a price of $7.95 is printed on instead. Father Cody is referred to instead of Father Callahan.
  • Third State - The revised flap shows an unclipped price of $7.95 and the correct Father Callahan is printed.


Very few of the First issue dust jackets are known to exist. They had the incorrect printed price of $8.95 and the incorrect “Father Cody” on the front flap. 

This price mistake was quickly caught at the printer and prices were clipped off these early dust jackets. A new price of $7.95 was added but the incorrect “Father Cody” remained, making them the second-issue jackets. 

Third-issue jackets were completely reprinted, with the correct price and the priest’s name corrected to “Father Callahan.” Fantasy and Horror 6-203. Underwood & Miller 14. Text block bound in “upside down” (i.e., Doubleday imprint at spine “head”).


Photos of the actual book


Reviews

Stephen King’s best-selling second novel “gave birth not only to gaggles of vampire stories… but also all kinds of creepy works in general…’Salem’s Lot, because of its genuineness, its verve, its originality, its willingness to reflect, expand and celebrate its sources, and, most importantly, its establishment of Stephen King… as a pioneer in a field ripe for re-invention, was germinal and originative of the entire boom in horror fiction” (Horror 100 Best 72). 


 “King’s ability, through the overlayering of seemingly irrelevant mundane details, to generate a sense of wrongness found its first full flowering in this novel” (Clute & Grant, 537). 



Additional Information

The title King originally chose was Second Coming, but he later decided on Jerusalem’s Lot. The publishers, Doubleday, shortened it to the current title, thinking the author's choice sounded too religious.

Stephen King's second book, 'Salem's Lot (1975)--about the slow takeover of an insular hamlet called Jerusalem's Lot by a vampire patterned after Bram Stoker's Dracula--has two elements that he also uses to good effect in later novels: a small American town, usually in Maine, where people are disconnected from each other, quietly nursing their potential for evil; and a mixed bag of rational, goodhearted people, including a writer, who band together to fight that evil.

Simply taken as a contemporary vampire novel, 'Salem's Lot is great fun to read, and has been very influential in the horror genre. But it's also a sly piece of social commentary. As King said in 1983, "In 'Salem's Lot, the thing that really scared me was not vampires, but the town in the daytime, the town that was empty, knowing that there were things in closets, that there were people tucked under beds, under the concrete pilings of all those trailers. And all the time I was writing that, the Watergate hearings were pouring out of the TV.... Howard Baker kept asking, 'What I want to know is, what did you know and when did you know it?' That line haunts me, it stays in my mind.... During that time I was thinking about secrets, things that have been hidden and were being dragged out into the light."

The title King originally chose was Second Coming, but he later decided on Jerusalem’s Lot. The publishers, Doubleday, shortened it to the current title, thinking the author's choice sounded too religious.

Legacy

’Salem’s Lot was the first of King’s books to have a huge cast of characters, a trait that would appear again in later books such as The Stand. The town of Jerusalem’s Lot would also serve as a prototype for later fictional towns of King’s writing, namely Castle Rock, Maine and Derry, Maine.

King reused the character Father Callahan, the local priest whose faith falters in the dreadful presence of Barlow, in his The Dark Tower series. He appears in Wolves of the Calla, Song of Susannah, and The Dark Tower, and provides insights into his experiences after being exiled from 'Salem's Lot.

’Salem’s Lot was also the first novel by King in which the main character is a writer, a device he would use again in a number of novels and short stories. Mark Petrie's chant used for repelling the vampiric Danny Glick is reused in another King novel, It.

At one point, Mears explains his experience in the Marsten house, including seeing the body of the dead previous occupant. This is, obviously, impossible. However, Mears describes it as being a leftover or a remnant of what had happened there, just like the haunting of the Overlook Hotel in King's The Shining.


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